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When Should you Update your Free Will?

You will continue to have a free will account that privately stores the will document details that you enter into the free will forms and use to make your will, at FreeLawyer.com. You can take best advantage of that service by taking the very few minutes it only takes to update your will using the free will forms whenever your personal situation changes. This is a very good use of a few minutes of your time, and is a unique capability of the FreeLawyer.com service. Visit the website, and update your will, as often as you like, with no extra charges for that service.

By now, you are probably wondering what sort of “personal” changes would justify the effort of changing your will. Well, it turns out there are a lot of changes going on in our lives that can affect the detail of what happens to our assets upon our untimely demise.

The more common things that change in our personal situation are: getting married or in a common law relationship since you especially need to be clear if there is anything that you don’t want your spouse to inherit; getting divorced since you will want to clarify that your assets will not be inherited by your newly ex-spouse, and if you have minor children, to clarify their guardianship in the event of your demise. Also common, is to have a baby, as that will mean you need to add that person to the will as a beneficiary, and also ensure the testamentary trust and guardianship issues properly addressed, to handle the new addition to the family.

Other things that may give you need to use the free will forms to revise your will are: a new stepchild if you are getting married to someone that already has a child or children; a major purchase, or major change in financial well being; and then there is simply the possibility that you change your mind which can either “just happen” or could be triggered by changes in status of your beneficiaries. For instance, children also age, and grow to no longer be minors; family members become deceased; or needs of beneficiaries change due to their own life events.